Sun Life: Client’s Stories

Sun Life has developed a series of testimonial videos to highlight how their products and their service help real people.

Click the link below to hear these stories. 

https://www.sunlifebrokervoices.com/c/al/65ocCGtgnek7jJyW8HC2Bv/6bdWPLNKgQT72Dd8uCwEbH

How Can I Choose The Best Health Care Plan For Me?

When it comes to selecting a health insurance plan, premium is the most important factor for many shoppers (and especially those who are currently healthy). But price shouldn't be the only factor upon which you base your selection – even if your primary concern is financial (as opposed to things like provider networks, drug formularies, and quality ratings).

Click the Link Below:

http://www3.vestorly.com/posts/vestorly-22222222222222222222222222222222222227-how-can-i-choose-the-best-health-plan-for-me?query_params_id=5a031c239afa98000381e27a

SENATE REJECTS EFFORTS TO REPEAL THE ACA

OVERVIEW

In the early morning hours of July 28, 2017, members of the U.S. Senate voted 49-51 to reject a “skinny” version of a bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA), called the Health Care Freedom Act (HCFA).

This was the final vote of the Senate’s 20-hour debate period, and effectively ends the Republicans’ current efforts to repeal and replace the ACA. However, the skinny repeal bill may be reintroduced at some point in the future.

IMPACT ON EMPLOYERS

Because the Senate was unable to pass any ACA repeal or replacement bill, the ACA remains current law, and employers must continue to comply with all applicable ACA provisions.

 

NEXT STEPS

Following the vote, Senator McConnell indicated that Republicans now intend to focus on other legislative issues, although they remain committed to repealing the ACA. Despite this, the Senate may choose to reintroduce the HCFA, or pursue its own ACA repeal and replacement, at a future date.

 

Trump Administration Aims to Reduce Regulatory Burden

The executive order does not require employers to take immediate action. However, employers should continue to monitor any developments that may affect their compliance with federal law in various areas, including banking, employment benefits, health, environmental protection, transportation and workplace safety.

The Memorandum

The memorandum (memo) directs federal agencies to place a freeze on any rule, guidance or regulation that has not yet become effective as of Jan. 20, 2017. Specifically, the memo asks federal agencies to:

  • Refrain from sending to the Office of the Federal Register (OFR) any regulation that has not been reviewed by a newly appointed department or agency head;
  • Withdraw any regulations sent to the OFR if they have not yet been published; and
  • Postpone for 60 days the effective date of any regulations that have been published by the OFR but have not yet become effective.

An exemption from this directive applies to any emergency situation and other urgent circumstances relating to health, safety, financial or national security matters. However, state agencies are required to notify the OMB director (Director) of any regulations that, in their view, should be exempt from this directive. The notification must also include the agency’s explanation for why an exemption should be allowed.

The Executive Order

As mentioned above, the executive order requires federal agencies to identify two regulations for elimination for every regulation they propose to implement. However, the order allows for an exemption for any regulation that is related to military, national security and foreign affairs as well as regulations regarding agency organization, management and personnel.

The order also directs federal agencies to maintain a neutral budget expenditure, meaning that federal agencies will not be allowed to exceed their budgets for the cost of proposing, adopting, implementing, enforcing or repealing any regulation. To this end, federal agencies have been directed to offset the cost of any new regulations by eliminating the costs of existing regulations.

The key person for implementation of this order is the OMB Director. The order gives the Director a great deal of discretion to authorize additional exemptions and to define key terms such as “cost.” The Director has also been charged with the responsibility to issue guidance on the processes and standards the agencies will need to follow to comply with this order.